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Housley Stars!

9 Nov

2013 Fall Housley Class

Yesterday we wrapped up our fifth offering of the Housley Principled Leadership Program at Texas State University. The thirty students in the class are outstanding examples of the extraordinary young leaders that the Stelos Alliance was created to support. I am very proud of all of them for the commitment they made to themselves and their classmates. It has been a pleasure watching them mature week to week.

These young people know who they are, what they believe, and what makes them come alive. Their comments about the program validate its objectives. Here is what they said during our closing ceremony:

“Housley gave me the confidence to take risks.”

“Housley forced me to specify my mission in life.”

“Housley helped me define my strengths and grow up.”

“Housley clarified my values and caused me to reevaluate everything.”

“Housley changed my life.”

The program is full of high-talent student leaders that are prepared to make their mark on the world. In our final session we discussed the role of service in leadership and our obligations to each other. The students commented on my essay titled, The Debt.  All I can say is, “Look out world.”

I want to especially recognize the four recipients of the Housley scholarships. They are:

Rachel Wilson
Aleecia Head
Meghan Bates
Christian Carlson

Please join me in congratulating them for this recognition. They really are Stelos Super Stars.

In the spring we will continue to offer Housley at Texas State and are expanding the course to both Trinity and Angelo State Universities. You can read about the Trinity course offering here. Please let me know if you are interested in getting involved.

2013 Kalypsonian of the Year

3 Oct

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I was at a recruiting event in Texas last week and was asked the question, “What are the attributes you value when evaluating candidates?”

The first part of the answer was easy and boring. I said we want reliable people that possess a strong work ethic, creative types with sharp minds, and leaders that have demonstrated ability and ambition.

But what is it that makes the people of Kalypso special?

The people of Kalypso are so much more than just those great professional attributes I listed. They are as humble as they are smart, as funny as they are fearless, and they radiate positivity as they support their clients, colleagues, and compadres. They might have graduated at the top of their class, but they still know how to have fun in a state school kind of way. Most of the people on the team are a little bit quirky (this is a polite word for weird.)

In 2013, the person that best exemplified the Kalypso brand of professional was Colin Speakman – our Kalypsonian of the Year.

For the rest of the year he is only to be referred to as “Your Highness, Mr. Colin Speakman, Kalypsonian of the Year.” No abbreviations, shortcuts or informalities allowed.

The choice was not difficult. Colin is the Kalypso prototype. Not only is he an incredibly competent consultant, he displays all of the characteristics we admire in our colleagues. He is a great father and he accepts the fact that he is inferior to his wife in basketball, fishing, and just about any other activity that requires either brains or athletic skills.

Colin knows more about barbeque sauce than anyone else I know. As a kid in upstate New York he wanted to grow up to be a pumpkin farmer. Colin smiles a lot. He either knows something you don’t, or maybe he is just goofy that way. We all love Colin and I am proud to have him as a colleague and even happier to call him a friend.

Colin is an optimist and a dreamer. He is a Cleveland Browns season ticket holder.

At least he can say that he won something this year. Congratulations Mr. Kalypsonian of the Year!

Getting Ahead Virtually

20 Jul

As published in the Daily Muse, July 2013.

http://www.thedailymuse.com/careeradvice/getting-ahead-in-an-office-less-environment/

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Getting ahead at any company requires a certain amount of strategy. But a company that operates virtually—with no offices, no cubicles, and no in-person meetings? That’s a different game entirely.

As the leader of a global professional services firm that operates in a completely virtual manner, I have dozens of people working without a traditional office environment. Some work from home, others are always on the road, and some prefer the local coffee shop (or bar). But regardless of where they work, there are some things that distinguish the best digital workers from the rest.

If you’re looking to impress in your virtual workplace, follow these five steps to success.

Step 1: Be Available

The most important thing you must do to succeed in this environment is to be available. Since you’re not sitting down the hall from your boss or teammates, you need to keep online communication open. If your co-workers have a hard time reaching you when they need to, it slows down their progress—and the company’s.

Does that mean you’re destined for a life chained to your desk? Not necessarily. I really don’t care where you work: If you can be productive bagging rays by the pool or are able to effectively perform your duties on top of a mountain, that’s great—as long as I can reach you. But just as you wouldn’t slip out of a physical office in the middle of the afternoon without telling anyone, you shouldn’t mysteriously go MIA from the web. If you need to be offline during normal business hours, let your boss, subordinates, or anyone else who may need you know that you’ll be unavailable and when you’ll be back.

Step 2: Be Productive

Once you’ve got the availability down, it’s time to get to work. And I mean, really get to work. Since your boss can’t see that you’re putting in time every day, you don’t get much credit for effort. As a virtual worker, you can only prove you’re working hard by producing results.

Sounds simple, but where I see employees trip up is when they’re struggling with an assignment or when something’s more difficult than it appears. If that’s the case, say something to your manager. He’ll still be able to tell you’re working hard if you ask for help, but if you prolong the task and don’t get it done in a reasonable amount of time, he might just think that you’re taking advantage of the flexibility of working remotely.

Step 3: Set Boundaries

This may seem counterintuitive as a way to impress, but the virtual employees I respect most are the ones who get their work done—but who also establish work-life boundaries. Without an office to leave at the end of the day, it can be easier for your work life to seep into the rest of your life. I, for one, am a huge workaholic, and have no problem reaching out to my employees at odd hours of the night. I can easily fill my employees’ free time with work—but I will also respect whatever boundaries they establish as long as they continue to turn in good work.

It’s unlikely that your boss wants to interrupt your exercise time, your family time, your dog-walking time, or your reality TV time (and if she does, you have bigger issues to deal with). So be clear with her (and yourself!) about what your work-life boundaries are. As long as you’re getting your work done, your boss shouldn’t blink when you tell her, “Not right now—I am watching The Bachelor.” You’ll be a happier employee, and your work will show it.

Step 4: Manage Your Career 

Doing your job well may win you kudos, but it will not ensure that you continue to grow as a professional. After all, working virtually can lead to an “out of sight, out of mind” situation where your steady contributions are taken for granted and no one is pushing you to greater heights.

So, in order to advance your career, you have to be proactive about seeking out more challenging assignments and plotting a development course for yourself. Work hard to find new areas in which you could contribute or high-level projects you could take on, and don’t be shy about sharing with your boss and co-workers what your goals are within the company. If you don’t, you won’t advance.

Step 5: Connect and Lead

Creating culture and camaraderie in an office-less organization is very difficult. So, your company likely needs connectors who pull people together to share experiences and build a collective ethos. And if you can be that person while still getting your work done, it will be a huge testament to your success.

Look for ways to be a leader among your virtual colleagues: Force everyone in your local area to leave their homes once a week and find a place to get together and work. Offer to help on assignments. Swap stories. Counsel one another. Your efforts will not go unnoticed by your colleagues—or your manager.

Succeeding in an office-less environment is difficult. It requires an enormous amount of self-discipline and a commitment to yourself and the company. There is a clear distinction between those who survive in this structure and those who thrive, but follow these steps, and you’ll be climbing up the (virtual) career ladder in no time.

Nurturing Talent

24 Jun

Creating an environment that is fun, flexible and fulfilling is essential to keeping young professionals engaged and committed

As published in Consulting Magazine, June 2013

http://www.consultingmag-digital.com/consultingmag/june_2013#pg24

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The sustained success of a management consulting firm is almost exclusively based on the continuous professional development of its people. The ability to attract, develop and retain young professionals is crucial to the long-term health and vitality of our firm, and of any other similarly structured firm.

The current generation of new consultants has been shaped by tumultuous times. The average new MBA was in high school on 9/11 and likely completed his or her undergraduate studies just as the global financial crisis was unfolding. These events and the macro-economic environments that they created shape the world view of young professionals. While there remains a tremendous collective anxiety on the economic front, new consultants are looking for more than just job security. They want to create a better, more secure and more stable world.

While these young professionals are ambitious, the odds of a new college graduate or recent MBA making it to the partner level are not good. In most firms this is an eight to ten year journey with a success rate of less than five percent. The reasons people leave the profession are well-known. Some fall out because they fail to develop the skills or lack the intellectual horsepower to be promoted. The “up or out” model is still prevalent in the industry. Other individuals decide that the lifestyle is not for them and opt for a job without the constant travel and long hours.

How then do we create an environment in the industry that attracts outstanding young professionals, allows them to develop rapidly and, most importantly, keeps them engaged on the long road to becoming a partner?

Our investment in the development of young people doesn’t always show up directly in the firm’s financial reports, but it is up there with new client acquisition as the most expensive — and most important — function of the firm. Attracting, developing and retaining young professionals require the leaders of the firm to create a work environment that is fun, flexible and fulfilling.

Hire Fun People and Create a Fun Environment

The idea that working in consulting should be fun is certainly not new. The “work hard, play hard” ethos was imprinted on us very early in our careers. The work we do for clients is very serious, but that doesn’t mean we don’t enjoy ourselves and the company of our colleagues while we go about our daily duties.

Hiring fun people that pass the “pizza test” is the first step in creating this environment. Would you really want to spend fourteen hours a day locked in a conference room with someone that you wouldn’t want to go get a pizza with afterward?

Once a firm hires fun people, it can retain talent for the long haul by helping its employees view the firm as a social network. There is a strong positive correlation between those people that routinely show up for Friday afternoon happy hour and those that make it to partner. When you work with your closest friends and have fun doing work you love, it is pretty hard to walk away. Working hard is a natural part of a career in consulting. The leaders of the firm should encourage and facilitate the “play hard” component of the equation and make sure that our teams are enjoying themselves.

Making sure that eager, energetic and fun young consultants have a good time is not that difficult. It might involve leaving the client at 6 p.m. once a month for team bowling or taking off a little early every once in a while for some “pau hana” festivities. With a little imagination we can almost always come up with something to celebrate. (National Margarita Day is February 22 and my birthday is on November 20if you need an excuse to party.)

Create a Flexible Work Environment

Young professionals are also looking for flexibility in their jobs. Delivering on this objective means moving away from the rigidity of work and travel schedules that tend to be the norm in consulting. The easiest way to accomplish this is to provide our teams the autonomy to negotiate a schedule that meets client demands and provides flexibility for each of the members of the team. An occasional week working from home or fewer nights on the road can be the difference between a sustainable career and our industry’s most valuable people looking for the exit.

Flexibility extends to liberal personal time off and sabbatical policies. We might even question why we have vacation policies. Doesn’t the individual utilization metric give us the information we need about each consultant’s contribution to the financial health of the firm? Are we just being ironic when we refer to time between assignments as being “on the beach?” We all need time to go to the dentist, get the oil changed and attend a child’s school play. Providing our young professionals with the autonomy to make their own decisions regarding how they get their work done will go a long way to improving retention.

Help Young Professionals Find Purpose in Their Work

Finally, young professionals are seeking fulfillment in their work. Having come of age in an era where their exceptionalism has been called into question, they want to know that their life’s work has meaning. When candidates are evaluating career opportunities, they are not just looking at compensation and career path; they are asking hard questions about the purpose of the firm itself. If we can cast the work we do in the industry in a manner that promotes growth, global competitiveness and sustainability, we will be a more attractive home for this generation of professional.

Creating outlets for community service within the firm and providing time off for individuals to pursue their passions outside of work are both avenues to addressing the need for fulfillment in a career. Taking on an occasional pro bono assignment for a non-profit is a great way to harness the intellectual horsepower and energy of the firm in a manner that serves the consultant as well as the client.

Fun, flexibility and fulfillment will go a long way to improving our ability to attract and retain young professionals. People are attracted to consulting because of the diversity of experiences available in most firms, the rapid development potential and the excitement of a fast paced lifestyle. Keeping them engaged and committed on the multi-year path to partner is the challenge. Our younger professionals are seeking direction, yet they crave autonomy and flexibility. They are willing to work hard when presented with opportunities for development, especially when those opportunities serve a greater purpose.

It is a trite truism that people are our most valuable asset. In consulting, they are often our only asset. Proactively increasing the value of these assets through development and retention of young professionals is one of our most strategic objectives. We should do a little consulting to ourselves and make sure we are adapting the industry to ensure the future generation of partners stays committed to the profession.

Stelos Scholars

16 May

2013 Stelos Scholars

The Stelos Alliance Awards Banquet was held on Sunday, April 28th in San Marcos. We had about 70 people attend the event where we awarded scholarships to exceptional student leaders from Texas State.

Stelos proudly leads the effort to raise money for a number of annual awards that benefit Texas State students. The scholarships include the Bill Hogue Memorial, John Garrison Leadership Award, Tommy Raffen Memorial, Student Foundation Scholarships, Chi Omega Virginia Moore Scholarship, and the Housley Principled Leadership Awards.

We also began a fellowship program this year. Students selected as Stelos Fellows create a paid, semester-long internship with the Stelos Alliance that is customized to best suit their individual career objectives.

This is the 23rd year that the Bill Hogue Memorial Scholarship has been awarded to a member of the Texas State Student Foundation. The recipient this year is another outstanding student leader, Ryan Gates. Ryan will be graduating with honors this May with dual Bachelor of Science degrees in Mathematics and Biochemistry. He currently serves as the Vice President of Administration for Student Foundation and has been a member since 2010. His GPA of 3.89 kept him on the Dean’s List every semester of his college career. His older brother Stephen received the same scholarship two years ago. The Gates do it right.

We recognized another five members of Student Foundation with scholarship awards:

  • Danielle Bonanno graduates this May with a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice and starts law school in the fall. She also won a Housley Principled Leadership Award this spring.
  • Nathan McDaniel will be graduating August 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. Nathan completed the Housley Principled Leadership Program as a sophomore in 2011.
  • Ashley Brown is graduating this May with a Bachelor of Public Administration degree.
  • Devan Reynolds graduates in May with a Bachelor of Public Administration degree.
  • Terrile Murphy also graduates in May with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology.

The John Garrison Leadership Award recipient is Lindsey Hendrix. Lindsey graduates in May with a Bachelor of Science degree in Communication Disorders. She served as the Executive Assistant in the Associated Student Government and was an active member of Student Foundation. She went through the very first edition of the Housley Principled Leadership Program back in 2011.

This is our fourth year to award the Tommy Raffen Memorial Scholarship and this year’s recipient is Andrew Henley. Andrew is graduating in August 2013 with a Bachelor of Public Administration degree. He currently serves as the Executive Vice President of Student Foundation, as well as, Senate Pro Tempore for the Associated Student Government. Andrew is a Housley grad and was a Stelos Fellow this spring.

This year, we were proud to award the Virginia Moore Chi Omega Scholarship for the second time. The recipient of this award is Mindy Green. Mindy is currently majoring in Public Relations at Texas State University. She is an active member of Chi Omega, where she currently serves as the sorority’s Scholarship Chairwoman. Mindy was a star in the Housley Principled Leadership Program this semester.

The Housley Principled Leadership Program continues to grow. We conducted the class in both the fall and spring this academic year and had over 60 Texas State students complete the course. These are amazing students. For the past two years both the President and Vice President of ASG have been through the program; Nathan McDaniel, Alison Sibley, Vanessa Cortez, and Eddie Perez are all graduates, as are a large number of ASG senators. We are proud of all that they are accomplishing during their time on campus.

The following eight student leaders participated in Housley in either the fall or the spring and received scholarship awards for their active participation and contributions to the success of the course:

  • Karli Koerner is currently majoring in Communication Studies at Texas State University. Karli was also a Stelos Fellow this spring doing marketing, event planning and Housley coordination.
  • Adam Odomore is currently majoring in International Relations at Texas State University. He was the only freshman in Housley last fall and is simply an extraordinary young man.
  • Danielle Bonanno graduates this May with a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice. She is also a Student Foundation Scholarship recipient and future Supreme Court justice.
  • Taylor Dorn is graduating this May with a Bachelor of Science in Geology.
  • Loic Hamilton graduated this past December with a bachelor’s degree in Accounting.
  • Kameron Fehrmann is currently majoring in Communication Design at Texas State University.
  • Ryan Elliot is currently majoring in International Studies at Texas State University.
  • Jamie Lahiere also graduates in May with a Bachelor of Business Administration in Management.

We are extremely proud of these young leaders and are amazed by their character, commitment to service, enthusiasm, and incredible accomplishments.  They will all go on to do great things and make us proud. Please join me in both congratulating and thanking them for all they have done for Texas State.

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